Bandung’s Newest Park Hip: Teras Cikapundung

The iconic red bridge of Teras Cikapundung (the Cikapundung Terrace).
The iconic red bridge of Teras Cikapundung (the Cikapundung Terrace).

There have been a lot of hips about going to the public parks in Bandung lately. And that’s partly because, more than at any time in its recent history, Bandung has once again become a park city. Old and existing parks have been revived and new parks built at an uprecedented rate since the current mayor, M. Ridwan Kamil, took office in 2013.

It’s no wonder that providing more open green space and parks has been one of Mr. Kamil’s top priorities after taking office. He’s a top knotch architect and city planner with international accolades and award-winning projects before deciding to run for the top office in his own city. Reviving existing parks and creating new ones are part of his vision in making Bandung a happier place for its citizens.

The amphitheatre stage of the Teras Cikapundung with the red bridge at the background.
The amphitheatre stage of the Teras Cikapundung with the red bridge at the background.

Teras Cikapundung (Cikapundung Terrace) is one of these new parks. It’s been a hip in the social media for a while since it was officially opened early this year. I actually visited it once before when it was in the final stage of its construction. Now I thought it’s time to visit it again and see for myself what the hip is all about.

Teras Cikapundung (TeCi) is located on Siliwangi Street, a main road connecting Cihampelas and Ciumbuleuit Streets on the west side of the Cikapundung river and Tamansari Street on the east side of the river. The location used to be a dirty, makeshift river bank kampong. (You can Google-map it to see exactly where it is.)

The fish 'turtle pond' where endemic fish of the Cikapundung river is kept before being released back into the river.
The fish ‘turtle pond’ where endemic fish of the Cikapundung river is kept before being released back into the river.

The TeCi project began in 2013 and was scheduled to finish in 2014. Its completion was delayed due to the difficulty in the land acquisition process and the relocation of its squatters.

Teras Cikapundung occupies an area of about 1,800 square meters and is divided into three areas or zones: a singing and dancing fountain park, an amphitheatre for art performances and, on the other side of the river, connected with a pretty red bridge, a park with gazebos and a fish pond that also serves as a breeding place for the Cikapundung river endemic fish.

Leisurely rafting on the Cikapundung river at Teras Cikapundung.
Leisurely rafting on the Cikapundung river at Teras Cikapundung.

Teras Cikapundung is quite accessible from any direction in the city. At least two angkot public transportation minibuses pass this park: the Ledeng – Cicaheum and Ciroyom – Cicaheum lines. Driving here is not recommended, however. The park only has a small parking space that can only accomodate motorcycles. Access to the park is free. The only fee you need to pay is for motorcycle parking, which costs 3000 rupiahs.

One of the art works you can enjoy at Teras Cikapundung.
One of the art works you can enjoy at Teras Cikapundung.
There is no inscription anywhere telling me about what this piece of sculpture work is, but the stone and bright coloured wood combination is very eye-catching.
There is no inscription anywhere telling me about what this piece of sculpture work is, but the stone and bright coloured wood combination is very eye-catching.

So what can you see and do here?

Well, first of all it’s a park, a public park. You can do what anyone would usually do in park: strolling, having a picnic with family or friends, or just sit in one of the benches reading a book. Many, however, come here just to take pictures, selfies or wefies – like many young peole I saw that day. For a small fee, you can also do a leisurely rafting. The park is quite beautiful, I must say. The layout and the works of art dotting the place are quite attractive too. Other than that, there’s nothing much to rave about. I think the park is attractive mainly for local visitors, those from Bandung and its vicinities, who have been deprived of open green space like this for too long.

"Tanah Biru" (Blue Soil), a ceramic stone ware sculpture work by Taufiq Panji Wisesa, one of the art works dotting the Teras Cikapundung.
“Tanah Biru” (Blue Soil), a ceramic stone ware sculpture work by Taufiq Panji Wisesa, one of the art works dotting the Teras Cikapundung.

I personally rather like the place and may drop by again sometime when I happen to pass by or when there’s an interesting art performance going on. I don’t think I’ll deliberately come here though, especially during the weekend when it’s crowded. Being an introvert, I think I’d rather go somewhere quieter.

 

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